30th PGA Championship





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A 36-hole qualifying round to get into match play was conducted the Wednesday and Thursday before the Championship. Defending Champion Jim Ferrier was exempt, and 63 players qualified for the field. Skip Alexander was low qualifier with a 134. A score of 149 qualified for match play, with six players at 150 having a play

The first and second rounds were 18 holes each, played in one day, with the remaining matches being played at 36 holes.

The finals had an unusual touch, because for the third time someone from the Turnesa family was trying to win the PGA Championship. In 1927, Mike’s brother, Joe, lost to Hagen in the finals, and his brother, Jim, was beaten by Sam Snead in 1942. Ben Hogan was trying to win the U.S. Open and the PGA in the same year for the first time since Gene Sarazen did it in 1922, and, despite being outdriven by Turnesa on every hole, Hogan used his irons with deadly accuracy in his 7-and-6 victory. Hogan toured the morning round in 66 to go 4-up, and in spite of a short rally from Turnesa in the afternoon, won the 28th, 29th and 30th holes to close out the match. For the week, Hogan was 35-under for the 213 holes he played, and after the Championship, a weary Hogan said he didn’t think he would ever play in the PGA Championship again. The grind of 10 rounds in five days was too much, even though he won the U.S. Open the following month and reconsidered his decision. His automobile accident of 1949 left his battered legs unable to go 36 holes. He didn’t return to the PGA Championship until 1960, the third year after the switch to a stroke-play format.

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